Once upon Round Island | by Aurelie Hector

‘The wild child’. This is how aunties and uncles used to refer to me as a kid. For them it was a little expression that described my hyperactive personality, my head for adventures and my unending curiosity for nature. Well, for me it was more than that. It has provided the definition of my true identity that has led to my passion and love for wildlife up to this present day. Later on it came as no surprise to anyone when I decided to become a conservation biologist to devote my time and effort to the protection of mother nature. …

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Picture the Nature | by Azman Salleh

Being a hobbyist wildlife photographer demands me to visit quieter places where there is less human presence. Obviously this doesn’t sound fun (we all need to socialize with fellow human beings after all), but the boredom balances out once I get to see the nature and observe the antics of the wildlife. The whole experience in trying to capture images of wildlife is an entertainment in itself. Walking around with a camera, listening to the sound of the jungle, and hurrying for shelter when the rain starts to fall are all good fun and workout. And the reward is beautiful …

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The day the elephants came to tea | by Alex Chalkley

I was awoken early as usual by the dawn chorus of the Vwaza Marsh Wildlife Reserve, in northern Malawi. This 986 km2 of understudied Marshland and Miombo woodland was to be my home for the next 9 months, as I settled into my role as an elephant researcher. As I turned over to try and catch a few more moments of peaceful slumber, a pair of Tropical Boubou landed on the bushwillow outside my tent and began their morning territory calls, signalling to others that this patch of the marsh is theirs; So much for another 5 minutes I thought …

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The land of the wolverine | by Sam Puls

Summer in northern Lapland, time to volunteering at another conservation project. This time I was joining the Swedish Arctic Fox Project. With long days, only a few hours of total darkness each night, and a full schedule, we started our journey throughout the vast tundra of northern Sweden in search for arctic fox dens. It will be the 4th day of this trip that I will remember the most. We were about to give up for the day, but we pushed ourselves one last time to make it to our next designated GPS point. Our heavy backpack had drained our …

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The Masai Mara – It was a photography Safari | by Eric Olonana Sindiyo

Let you not be told that a day on safari can be similar to the next. 13 years as a safari driver guide has taught me that the wild can do things. Good things and dangerous things. Sometimes on safari we watch the bush for what can seem like ages for some action to happen. Other times the action comes to us and comes real close. Sometimes too close for comfort. Three years ago in November is still new to me. It had rained in Masai Mara. It was the short rains season but the sun managed to break through …

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The rare jungle cat that thrives in degraded rainforests | by Gianluca Cerullo

My nostrils had already been assaulted by months of trekking through the Bornean rainforest with an Aldi bag-for-life full of my own poo. Such is the price of conducting research on dung beetles. The one bonus? I thought I had become immunised to bad smells. But the putrid stench of carrion slammed me like a brick wall all the same. The truck crunched to a halt. Having just finished a particularly pungent day’s fieldwork, my blissfully empty Aldi bag-for-life and I were hitching a lift down the logging road and back to camp with some scientists who had been prescient …

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Mulling Over Culling | by Asiem Sanyal

To the majority of the world, Bermuda is one of two things – an exotic paradisiacal getaway, with pink sand-filled beaches to sink one’s toes into, and crystal clear turquoise waters to frolic in; or a place shrouded in mystery, situated in the heart of the Bermuda Triangle, where ships and aeroplanes disappear mysteriously, never to be seen again. The island, however, is a little bit of both. As any ecologist will tell you, beauty and deadliness manifest in a form not readily visible at the surface. To be able to see this, one needs to dive some metres below …

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The one that got away | by Alex Brickle

The Iberian Wolf: It can smell and hear its prey from miles away, has a huge territory and, with a top speed of 30mph, can dart across a field in seconds. So to see one you’d have to be at exactly the right spot at the right time. This’ll be easy, we thought to ourselves. We had already seen a bear and lynx in Spain and didn’t think seeing a wolf would be too hard, so after arriving in Santa Cruz de los Cuérragos, we set out into the mountains yet again. We had a new telescope so yeah, we …

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Tracking snakes in the Kalahari | by Thilo Beck

We’ve been in the Kalahari now for four weeks. We are doing a job that we couldn’t have imagined doing five years ago in a place we would not have believe existed. Living next door to every imaginable kind of wildlife would be special enough, but we get to combine that with regular interactions with some of the most interesting snakes southern Africa has to offer. Our daily routine includes catching snakes, investigating around sociable weaver colonies and tracking Cape cobras and boomslang. We usually go out in the mornings to catch the snakes on the move while tracking them, …

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Helios and Selene Delight | by Blair Charles Jones

I like the golden hours at Goldcliff Lagoon Reserve around sunrise and sunset. Not only is the light often amazing – and a challenge to work with, often there’s more bird life around to watch. But lately this very much depends on the tides. In recent months the behaviour of the birds has become intrinsically linked to the ebb and flow of the estuary’s water. Timing of my visits has therefore been important and getting that right has been challenging. Certain important things like work, illness and family get in the way, so often my visits have been at odds …

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