The Omen of Ostional – by Patrick Lally

On the morning of April 9th 2018, I found myself nearly three months into my Central American backpacking trip, I awoke to my last day on the ‘Rich Coast’, in the modest village of Nosara. A year prior and I would be found in urban London, on my way home from work, riding the wonders of the northern line. Not however, without the company of Paolo Coelho’s novel ‘The Alchemist’ to hand, a book about a young man who seeks wisdom and knowledge through adventure and omens. After gaining a degree in Anthropology, my passion for travel and culture was …

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Lessons learnt with the Orangutans in Borneo – by Glenio Araujo

I am still totally stoked when I remember one of my favourite adventures to see Orangutans in Borneo earlier this year. This was a busy travelling year ticking places off of bucket list-like, sailing down from the Southwest UK, to the beautiful Canary Islands and Mallorca; a quick stop at mom’s home Brazil to update documents after almost eight years on the road and at sea. Road trips through Thailand; more sailing around Southeast Asia; Indonesia, Singapore and Malaysia, whale watching from Australia and hanging with Komodo Dragons, the story behind the orangutan fill. And there I was, just about …

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The Incarnation of the New Form of Poaching – by Caroline

“You’re right, this is pretty rad!” My tanned, plainly elated friend chimed as she grabbed the bag of chips from my hand seeing as I had overstayed my turn with the snacks. “What’d you say his name is again?” Yea, grasping names was evidently not Merle’s forte. Against a Mt Kilimanjaro backdrop, renting the air was a melange of the stupefied gasps of onlookers, the click-snap sound of camera shutters and the revving of tour vehicles coming to a stop. In all likelihood, this was the ultimate safari experience, besides witnessing one of the big iconic savanna cats go at …

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12 blogging mistakes you want to avoid

We asked the judges and bloggers of Wildlife Blogger of the Year to share what never to do when blogging. Become a better blogger by avoiding these 12 blogging mistakes. “Never try to cover everything in one blog – you risk the story getting long and unfocused.” Daisy Ouya, Science Writer and Wildlife Blogger of the Year Judge. “You are taking a risk if you try to be funny. Sometimes people don’t realise you are being ironic, sarcastic or unbelievably witty and think that you are being serious. And even if they realise you are trying to be funny, they …

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Who’s your blogging Idol?

Ever wondered where bloggers’ inspiration for writing about wildlife comes from, apart from nature? We asked the bloggers and judges of Wildlife Blogger of the Year to reveal their blogging ‘idols’. Here’s what they had to say: “So many! I read a lot – but I don’t try to be like anyone else. I’m stuck with being me.” Mark Avery, Britain’s premier wildlife blogger and Wildlife Blogger of the Year Judge. “Mike Shanahan, author of “Ladders to Heaven” – he writes in a simple, accessible yet informative and entertaining style.” – Daisy Ouya, Science Writer and Wildlife Blogger of the Year …

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People just need to be directed in the right direction – by Winnie Cheche

People just need to be directed to the right direction. Most people fail to do the right thing due to lack of knowledge or exposure to wrong facts. It was during my twenty-seventh birthday. A friend of mine offered me a treat to Ol Donyo Sabuk, a mountain near Thika, Kenya. He got it right, I love nature and hiking. Hence it was the best gift. We decided to car pool with the like-minded. Fortunately, they were all strangers so I got an opportunity to many new friends. Every one kept time and by 6:30am we were on our way …

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Great horned owlet gets warm with mum – by Kate Paton

It was a bleak and bitterly cold winters day early in the year in Vancouver BC, Canada and the great horned owls were sitting on eggs. I had been watching and waiting at the nest site for weeks – waiting for the first sign of a baby owlet – wrapping up myself warm and waiting in the cold, dark winter. I was sure the adults recognized me and had begun to tolerate my presence as I kept well back and they understood I meant no harm and stood in awe of them. One day I was standing there, frozen fingers …

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The day I saw The Grey Ghost – by Suchismita Koulaskar

Down Jacket- checked, Gloves – checked, Cap – checked, Scarf – Checked, Woollen socks – checked, Snow boots – checked, Sunglasses – checked, Camera battery – checked , Empty SD and CF cards – checked, Camera setting – checked. My first on-foot experience of Himalaya’s at 4200 m altitude was about to begin. I needed to be doubly sure of everything, as I tend to forget the things if I am bit over-excited or over-apprehensive. At that point of time, I was both. Snow Leopard was not in my mind as it was just our first day in Spiti, with …

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The wild animal, unappreciated contribution – by Rukundo Joshua

The wild Animal Unseen love is the way animals are in our parks. They contribute to the socioeconomic development of our tourism areas but rarely do we recognize them. In Uganda, we get a lot of revenue from them; the income parks receive contributes towards the national budget. Unfortunately, we appreciate them not. When they are hungry and come to feed on our crops, we forget the bigger picture and poison them or even hunt them. The good side of them is that they never take revenge; they run back to the forest for their dear lives. They forgive us …

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Into The Mist: Gorilla Tracking in Rwanda’s Volcanoes National Park – by Scott Dicken

I didn’t know what to expect the first time I went gorilla trekking. I’d been on safaris in Kenya and Tanzania, but gorilla trekking was something altogether different. Imagining what I might be about to experience evoked memories of watching ‘Gorilla’s in the Mist’ as a young child. Although, my memories of the movie are fairly hazy, my harrowing recollection of the violence of gorilla poaching in Rwanda stood in stark contrast to the unmitigated beauty of Volcanoes National Park. Although the challenges of combatting poaching still remain, the park today is a place much more welcoming of visitors, and …

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