Terra Incognita selected among the Top 10 Wildlife Travel Blogs

We’re excited to announce that Terra Incognita has been selected as one of the Top 10 Wildlife Travel Blogs to follow in 2019! Feedspot’s Top 10 Wildlife Travel Blogs is built from the most comprehensive list of wildlife travel blogs on the web. The best blogs were selected from thousands of wildlife travel blogs using search and social metrics and are “actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their readers with frequent updates and high-quality information.” The blogs were ranked based on the following criteria: Google reputation and Google search ranking. Influence and popularity on Facebook, Twitter and other social …

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Meeting our mission, vision and values

After officially launching Terra Incognita in 2018, this year we wanted to formally define who we are and what we stand for: our mission, vision and values. If you’ve worked with us, we hope you already have a good sense of our purpose and values, but for those who haven’t, we’re excited to share what we’re all about! Putting our mission into words Having seen the process of creating mission and vision statements in larger organisations – and the all-too-frequent arguments over adjective choice that can come with it – we wanted to keep the focus on defining the heart …

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Guyana named best ecotourism destination in the world

South America’s small and best-kept secret – Guyana – landed in the global sustainability spotlight overnight when the country was named the #1 ‘Best of Ecotourism’ destination in the world at the Sustainable Top 100 Destination Awards in Berlin. Hosted by travel and trade show ITB Berlin on 7 March 2019, the awards recognised “global leadership in offering responsible ecotourism opportunities”, judged based on sustainability success stories from the top 100 destinations. Guyana won against well-known destinations like the Galapagos Islands, Mexico’s Sierra Gorda and Tmatboey in Cambodia. While the awards may have put Guyana ‘on the map’ overnight, they …

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Responsible tourism is a win-win for giant river otters and people

Every year tourists make the journey deep into the Amazon to see giant river otters in their natural habitat. Human activities – including uncontrolled tourism – have landed these fascinating creatures on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (they are currently Endangered), but responsible tourism has started to turn things around. We caught up with Jessica Groenendijk, giant otter expert and author of the new book The Giant Otter: Giants of the Amazon, for a unique glimpse into otters and ecotourism – and how tourists can be part of the solution. Can you tell us a bit about giant …

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African Wild Dogs – A Road to Recovery

By Tolga Aktas I first journeyed with Wildlife ACT back in July 2018 where I flew out to KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa to volunteer on their Endangered Species Project. Finding genuine and reputable projects is a very difficult thing to do when you are embarking on your first project abroad, but when I came across Wildlife ACT – I knew immediately that I had found the right organisation. What inspired me the most to pack my things and leave the UK after completing my first year at university was the African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus). African wild dogs, which are also …

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Off the Beaten Track in Peru: Adventure meets Culture with Trek Hoppers

Kristi from Terra Incognita went on a six-day trip with new operator Trek Hoppers in December 2018. Here’s what she discovered off the beaten track in Peru. I closed my mouth only to have it fall open again. Machu Picchu was suddenly visible from across a valley, and it was neither cliché or tourist-laden as I’d expected. It looked like a granite crown growing out of the mountain itself, wrought by forces that didn’t seem human, its rough points emblazoned gold-yellow in the afternoon sun. Matt Waugh, our guide, had spent the last three hours of our hike downplaying the …

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Bringing Stories to Life: The Wildlife Blog Collection Book

Heading into January 2019, we set ourselves the challenge of publishing a 300-page book about wildlife in one month. Amazed by the quality and quantity of Wildlife Blogger of the Year entries, we decided to showcase and share these stories more widely in a book. Even more ambitiously, we challenged ourselves to compile, edit, design, market and publish all in one month. Thanks to 70 writers and bloggers from around the world who put their favourite wildlife moments into words, the writing was a collaborative effort. But if you take the time, energy and creativity each writer poured into crafting their …

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Snap! Behind the Scenes of Lion Selfies with Jess Murray

Hidden behind that cute-and-cuddly lion cub selfie is the chilling story of an industry that exploits – and eventually kills – lions. And it’s fuelled by tourists who think they’re helping. Conservationist Jess Murray’s powerful story about lion tourism and canned hunting – voted Second Runner Up by Wildlife Blogger of the Year judges – is based on a chilling undercover filming assignment in Africa. But she turned the experience into an important message for all travellers and wildlife-lovers. “I think good conservation blogs and stories have a responsibility to tackle controversial issues – and this one does that excellently”, …

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Mulling Over Culling with Marine Biologist Asiem Sanyal

You might not expect the – often distasteful – topic of culling for conservation to win over Wildlife Blogger of the Year judges, but Asiem Sanyal’s story did just that. ‘Mulling Over Culling‘, Sanyal’s informative account of culling lionfish in Bermuda (which, as it turns out, are actually quite tasty), voted him First Runner Up by judges. “The explosion of lionfish is a huge issue that many people are unaware of; this piece does a great job of bringing this urgent story to a wider audience”, said conservation blogger Dr James Borrell. Travel and nature writer James Lowen called it, …

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Wildlife for all Ages: An Interview with 12-year-old Runner Up Alex Brickle

Alex Brickle’s refreshing, honest play-by-play of a wildlife-moment-that-wasn’t (‘The one that got away‘) awarded him Second Runner Up place by the judges of Wildlife Blogger of the Year – at only age 12. When we launched the competition, we didn’t expect an entry from someone Alex’s age. But with stories from authors aged 12 to 74 around the globe, we enjoyed experiencing wildlife through so many different perspectives. We’re also beyond thrilled to hear that, as Alex puts it, “This competition has pushed me to become a better writer and I couldn’t be happier with the result.” We were curious …

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